CHARM contains a wide variety data for your community

CHARM pulls together data from local, state, and federal sources to support meaningful dialogue about vision and values for the future. We overlap these data sets and let users apply hypothetical land development styles on them. See below for what CHARM can bring to the table.


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CRITICAL FACILITIES

City, county and state lines are used to know where

Critical facilities include public services and utilities and show which might be vulnerable to natural hazards

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HURRICANE TRACK

These tracks show over 120 years of tracking data for tropical cyclones

TRANSPORTATION

Roads are classified by local, state, and federal classification

The grid is the CHARM unit of analysis. It holds over 20 core attributes about land characteristics in the grid and over 100 indicators once a scenario is started

CHARM approximates how many people are in each grid square using census and parcel data

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DEMOGRAPHICS

Pull in demographic data about age, income, and family size

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SOCIAL VULNERABILITY

These are demographic indicators that inform us about the capacity of populations to respond to disasters

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BASE FLOOD 

ELEVATION

Elevation is important, particularly with coastal hazards

BFE’s tell us about flood depth at certain points

Floodways are the most risk-prone section of rivers. Knowing where they are is important for planning

FIRM shows insurance zones based on 100 and 500 year risk zones

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FLOOD DEPTH GRIDS

Depth grids show flood depths for 100 and 500 year events

Environmental and sensitive habitat data can show us where these areas are in our communities

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PARCEL

contact  local appraisal district

Parcel data can help us understand land use activities happening in very specific locations

Land cover tells us the intensity of coverage in our communities, like impervious surface covery

Soils tells us about prime farmland areas, septic system drainage, and shrink-swell potential

Everyone lives in a watershed and are important for understanding how development impacts stormwater issues

Catchments are nested within larger watersheds and provide a finer scale for analysis

We use the National Weather Service storm surges models to inform our scenarios

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SEA LEVEL RISE

See how Sea Level Rise would affect your community

Wild-Urban interface is used to evaluate risks along the edge of development into undeveloped areas.